*conflicted pansexual noises*
WHEN SOMEONE CITES “UNPUBLISHED RESULTS”
What's the minimum you'd suggest spending on a tank? I'd like to add a Betta, a few other fish (maybe 10-15 fish total), plants, and a light and a heater. Also tips for newbie tanks?
Anonymous

pettyartist:

(You’re looking at a 29g or larger tank btw for that number of fish.  ;) )

My advice is to shop around!  Look for sales!  I know that PETCO just recently had a great sale that happens 2x a year (our dollar per gallon sale) but this time the Tetra LED kits were included at 50% off and they came with a free water care kit.

If you want to buy everything separate, get a lot of the smaller stuff online (heaters, filters, light, hood, etc).  You save money and once you hit a certain amount it’s free shipping on most sites.

For a newbie tank, freshwater community is the way to go. Easy, hardy dudes like platies, guppies, ghost shrimp and corydoras catfish are great fish/inverts for beginners and they come in a variety of colors and patterns!  Just remember, it’s 1-2 gallons per inch of adult-sized fish!  So a molly, which can get about 4 inches long, will need 4-8 gallons of water for just himself!

Also keep in mind that smaller tanks aren’t necessarily easier to maintain.  Smaller tanks mean more frequent maintenance, especially with a lot of fish!  A 10-20% water change should be done bi-weekly for tanks of 10-20 gallons and monthly for 29-ish gallons.  The carbon will need to be changed monthly.  (This is for community fish— goldfish are a whole different story, since they are messier fish in general.)

TL;DR: save up for a nice, big tanks and really REALLY do your homework before purchasing anything!  Reviews and research are a buyer’s best friend.  :>

nltm:

C:

nltm:

C:

typhonatemybaby:

mishawinsexster:

Friendly reminder that the Duckbill Platypus is not beaver sized but the tiniest most cutest patootie being in existence 

OH GOD

i thought these things were the size of like, large cats or something. ITS FUCKING TINY JESUS

cakesandcarpets:

in case you were wondering 
those are the designs for the back of the cards 

dirkminaj:

strider-inquire:

BRO: Hey there pretty mama.((Did i ever mention I used to watch a lot of Johnny Bravo as a kid?))

Oh my fucking god.

dirkminaj:

strider-inquire:

BRO: Hey there pretty mama.

((Did i ever mention I used to watch a lot of Johnny Bravo as a kid?))

Oh my fucking god.

that-kid-in-the-drifloon-hat:

mountaindave:

strawberrypatty:

thepfa:

nohetero:

scottthepilgrim:

which fucking fedora wearing friendzoned nerd made this thing

yeah but notice that the seal’s intent is to eat those fish and the shark offers a mutually beneficial relationship for them
in which a dudebro unintentionally makes a really accurate analogy for the reason that they’re single forever

That’s a whale shark. They’re docile and in no way threatening to people or those fish depicted. Seals, by contrast, will attack people, possibly out of a frustrated sense of entitlement combined with poor socialization skills.

When analogies fail but then actually are super truthful.

I think someone needs to put a fedora on the seal

hell yeeeeeeeahhh

that-kid-in-the-drifloon-hat:

mountaindave:

strawberrypatty:

thepfa:

nohetero:

scottthepilgrim:

which fucking fedora wearing friendzoned nerd made this thing

yeah but notice that the seal’s intent is to eat those fish and the shark offers a mutually beneficial relationship for them

in which a dudebro unintentionally makes a really accurate analogy for the reason that they’re single forever

That’s a whale shark. They’re docile and in no way threatening to people or those fish depicted. Seals, by contrast, will attack people, possibly out of a frustrated sense of entitlement combined with poor socialization skills.

When analogies fail but then actually are super truthful.

I think someone needs to put a fedora on the seal

hell yeeeeeeeahhh

enraptored:

noot noot

enraptored:

noot noot

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

interclouds:

dirkbot:

skepticarcher:

Stream results! :>

wait hold onKANAYA IS HER BOOK LIGHT

Rose has a problem with finding lights to read with.

interclouds:

dirkbot:

skepticarcher:

Stream results! :>

wait hold on
KANAYA IS HER BOOK LIGHT

Rose has a problem with finding lights to read with.